Gerald Vizenor: On his forthcoming novel & the White Earth Constitution

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TREATY SHIRTS October 1934—A Familiar Treatise on the White Earth Nation The Politics Behind Treaty Shirts: October 2034—A Familiar Treatise on the White Earth Nation At this moment, members of the White Earth Band of Ojibwe and Minnesota Chippewa Tribe1 are engaged in an urgent debate. The ratification of the new constitution by the White Earth Band of Ojibwe, in November 2013, renewed this blood quantum debate. “The new document removes a requirement that tribal citizens possess one-quarter Minnesota Chippewa Tribe blood, a controversial ‘blood quantum’ standard adopted at the urging of the federal government decades ago.”2 Author Statement, from Gerald Vizenor: Treaty Shirts is allegorical; not a parable but an ironic analogy. the subtitle, “A Familiar Treatise,” suggests that the seven narratives are allegorical,…

Congratulations to Brenda Hillman!

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Brenda Hillman is the newest member of the American Academy of Poets’ Board of Chancellors. This is an honorary position that has been held by some of the most distinguished poets in the United States, including W. H. Auden, John Ashbery, Elizabeth Bishop, Lucille Clifton, Yusef Komunyakaa, Adrienne Rich, and Mark Strand. Learn more at the website of the Academy of American Poets. Learn more about Brenda Hillman and her poetry at Wesleyan’s online readers companion. Hillman is an activist, writer, and teacher. She has published nine collections of poetry with Wesleyan University Press, including Pieces of Air in the Epic, winner of the William Carlos Williams Award (2006); Practical Water, winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Award for Poetry (2009); and Seasonal Works with Letters on Fire, winner of the…

Announcing Bax 2015 from Seth Abramson

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An annual anthology of the best new experimental writing   BAX 2015 is the second volume of an annual literary anthology compiling the best experimental writing in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. This year’s volume, guest edited by Douglas Kearney, features seventy-five works by some of the most exciting American poets and writers today, including established authors—like Dodie Bellamy, Anselm Berrigan, Thomas Sayers Ellis, Cathy Park Hong, Bhanu Kapil, Aaron Kunin, Joyelle McSweeney, and Fred Moten—as well as emerging voices. Best American Experimental Writing is also an important literary anthology for classroom settings, as individual selections are intended to provoke lively conversation and debate. The series coeditors are Seth Abramson and Jesse Damiani. DOUGLAS KEARNEY is a poet, performer, and librettist. He is the author…

Announcing Tempest-Tossed from Susan Campbell

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First full-length biography of a key figure in nineteenth-century American culture   Tempest-Tossed is the first full biography of the passionate, fascinating youngest daughter of the “Fabulous Beecher” family—one of America’s most high-powered families of the nineteenth century. Older sister Harriet Beecher Stowe was the author of Uncle Tom’s Cabin. Brother Henry Ward Beecher was one of America’s most influential ministers, and sister Catherine Beecher wrote pivotal works on women’s rights and educational reform. And then there was Isabella Beecher Hooker—“a curiously modern nineteenth-century figure.” She was a leader in the suffrage movement, and a mover and shaker in Hartford’s storied Nook Farm neighborhood and salon. But there is more to the story—to Isabella’s character—than that.   Isabella was an ardent Spiritualist. In daily life,…

Announcing The Selected Letters of John Cage

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Letters of an avant-garde icon available to the public for the first time   This selection of over five hundred letters gives us the life of John Cage with all the intelligence, wit, and inventiveness that made him such an important and groundbreaking composer and performer. The missives range from lengthy reports of his early trips to Europe in the 1930s through his years with the dancer Merce Cunningham, and shed new light on his growing eminence as an iconic performance artist of the American avant-garde. Cage’s joie de vivre resounds in these letters—fully annotated throughout—in every phase of his career, and includes correspondence with Peter Yates, David Tudor, and Pierre Boulez, among others. Above all, they reveal his passionate interest in people, ideas, and…

#tbt: At the Tomb of Mallarmé

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Today’s throwback Thursday poem was brought to my attention via a surprise Christmas gift from Clayton Eshleman: Eternity at Domme, a beautiful bi-lingual edition, published in France some years ago. I don’t know exactly when. The book has no copyright page.   At the Tomb of Mallarmé   Death is an erratic too source obscure to grasp. At the end of one glacial aisle The wanderlust of Mallarmé chrysalises. Black wires bend over his granite cocoon. In the breeze they tremor,                                       antennify.     Please be sure to check our our new books, The Sulfur Anthology, edited by Clayton Eshleman, and Azure: Poems and Selections from the “Livre,“ by…

Announcing A Sulfur Anthology from Clayton Eshleman

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A vital compendium of poetic vision   From 1981 to 2000, Sulfur magazine presented an American and international overview of innovative writing across forty-six issues, totaling some 11,000 pages and featuring over eight hundred writers and artists, including Norman O. Brown, Jorie Graham, James Hillman, Mina Loy, Ron Padgett, Octavio Paz, Ezra Pound, Adrienne Rich, Rainer Maria Rilke, and William Carlos Williams. Each issue featured a diverse offering of poetry, translations, previously unpublished archival material, visual art, essays, and reviews. Sulfur was a hotbed for critical thinking and commentary, and also provided a home for the work of unknown and younger poets. In the course of its twenty year run, Sulfur maintained a reputation as the premier publication of alternative and experimental writing. This was due…

#tbt: Happy Birthday Emily!

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Born December 10, 1830, Emily Dickinson did not became a literary icon until long after her death. Today, she is appreciated for her revolutionary poetic form and syntax . After the posthumous release of her journals, poems, and multitude of letters, Dickinson became one of American literature’s most prominent figures. Below is an excerpt from Wesleyan’s Dickinson anthology, A Spicing of Birds, a collection drawn from the 222 poems in which Dickinson mentions birds. 324   Some keep the Sabbath going to Church— I keep it, staying at Home— With a Bobolink for a Chorister— And an Orchard, for a Dome—   Some keep the Sabbath in Surplice— I just wear my Wings— And instead of tolling the Bell, for Church, Our little Sexton—sings.   God preaches, a noted…