Announcing My Music, My War from Lisa Gilman

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The Listening Habits of U.S. Troops in Iraq and Afghanistan A study of music in the everyday lives of U.S. troops and combat veterans. “A gifted interviewer, Lisa Gilman goes beyond stereotypes of the wounded American soldier by painting a complex and nuanced emotional portrait of contemporary soldiers’ lives, ones which the media rarely allow us to see and hear.” —Jonathan Ritter, coeditor of Music in the Post-9/11 World A study of music in the everyday lives of U.S. troops and combat veterans. During the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, technological developments in music listening enabled troops to carry vast amounts of music with them, and allowed them to easily acquire new music. Digital music files allow for easy sharing, with fellow troops as well…

“Hamilton” History Lessons & The Federalist Papers

The Federalist Papers, edited by Jacob E. Cooke

The Hamilton buzz won’t be ending anytime soon. Lin Manuel Miranda, a Wesleyan alum, has created a hit that will irrefutably change the stage and much beyond. With tickets basically impossible to lay your hands on to this phenomenal rejuvenation to both America’s early history and Broadway’s musical scene, it’s no surprise you can’t go a week without Hamilton coming up. This Broadway musical isn’t just helping American musical practice evolve, either—the show’s ubiquitous presence in American pop culture has teachers across the nation incorporating the score into their history lessons. This contemporary, youthful take on our “founding fathers’ is helping to  revitalize interest in America’s early history. Twenty-thousand New York City 11th graders will be able to go further than just incorporating the soundtrack, though: The Rockefeller Foundation and the…

ReaderCon-27 is on!

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ReaderCon-27 is upon us! This year’s conference is housed in a new location, the Quincy Marriott, Quincy, Massachusetts. Guests of honor are Catherynne M. Valente & Tim Powers; the memorial guest of honor is Diana Wynne Jones. Be sure to visit our table in the book room. Marketing Manager Jackie Wilson will be on hand, with our new books and favorite backlist titles. On Saturday, be sure to swing by to say hello to Chip Delany and Jim Morrow—who will be hanging out intermittently throughout the day. Author Events Samuel R. Delany Reading Friday Night, time TBA James Morrow Saturday, 10:00 AM, Reading Saturday, 11:00 AM, Kaffeeklatsch, with Jacob Weisman Saturday, 12:00 PM, Autographs, with Rick Wilber Saturday, 2:00 PM, “David Hartwell Memorial Panel,” with Robert…

László Moholy-Nagy Retrospective at the Guggenheim Museum

The Theatre of Bauhaus, Gropius

“You would hardly know, from this show, that Moholy-Nagy shared an era with Picasso and Matisse. Perhaps chalk it up to the First World War and the Russian Revolution and a fissure in Western culture between art that maintained conventional mediums and art that subsumed them in a romance with social change and new techniques. The former held firm in France; the latter flourished in Germany. Americans could thrill to both at once, as interchangeable symbols of the ‘modern.’ It was in America, while he was dying, that Moholy-Nagy seemed to realize and begin to remedy the imbalance, exposing the heart that had always pulsed within the technocratic genius. To be a student of his then must have been heaven,” writes The New Yorker’s art critic Peter…

Ted Greenwald, 1942–2016

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It is with sadness that we announce the passing of New York City poet Ted Greenwald (December 19, 1942–June 17, 2016). Ted Greenwald’s poems sing the commons and dance with a homely grace American poetry has rarely seen. WHIFF An evening Spent talking Spent thinking About what my life would be If I’d stayed With a particular girl or woman I went with What would be If I’d’ve been accepted to and gone Where I applied To a different school Than the one I did Where I’d learned Different social graces Then the ones I have Where some of the material Values of the American dream Had rubbed off Enough to make me Live it out In the good-works sense If I’d settled down And settled…

Benedict Arnold & AMC’s “Turn: Washington’s Spies”

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Wartime treachery, twisted spies and brutality—sound familiar? AMC’s period drama TURN: Washington’s Spies is in it’s third season, and tensions are rising in the Arnold household. One can understand how a man could be frustrated, having served as Washington’s finest battle commander only to be sent to work a desk job. This restless man would become synonymous with ‘traitor.’ If you’re loving the drama and intriguing politics of Turn, Eric Lehman’s Homegrown Terror: Benedict Arnold and the Burning of New London should be on your summer reading list. Maybe AMC’s Turn has you wondering how true the drama between John Andre, Peggy Shippen, and Benedict Arnold is? Or you’re interested in learning more about the charges leveled at Arnold surrounding his leniency towards Loyalists? This new take on the most reviled traitor of the Revolutionary War…

Announcing Treaty Shirts from Gerald Vizenor

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The imagined narratives of seven native exiles from the White Earth Nation Gerald Vizenor creates masterful, truthful, surreal, and satirical fiction similar to the speculative fiction of Margaret Atwood and Neil Gaiman.  In this imagined future, seven natives are exiled from federal sectors that have replaced federal reservations; they pursue the liberty of an egalitarian government on an island in Lake of the Woods.  These seven narrators, known only by native nicknames, are related to characters in Vizenor’s other novels and stories.  Vizenor was the principal writer of the Constitution of the White Earth Nation, and this novel is a rich and critical commentary on the abrogation of the treaty that established the White Earth Reservation in 1867, and a vivid visualization of the futuristic…

Announcing The Selected Letters of John Cage

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Letters of an avant-garde icon available to the public for the first time Events: May 1- Atlas Eclipticalis at Wesleyan May 7, NYPL for Performing Arts. This selection of over five hundred letters gives us the life of John Cage with all the intelligence, wit, and inventiveness that made him such an important and groundbreaking composer and performer. The missives range from lengthy reports of his early trips to Europe in the 1930s through his years with the dancer Merce Cunningham, and shed new light on his growing eminence as an iconic performance artist of the American avant-garde. Cage’s joie de vivre resounds in these letters—fully annotated throughout—in every phase of his career, and includes correspondence with Peter Yates, David Tudor, and Pierre Boulez, among…