Janet Collins film project options Wesleyan’s biography

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PRESS RELEASE IMMEDIATE RELEASE Janet Collins Film Project Options Her Biography As CRC Productions moves forward on its film project about Janet Collins, the Metropolitan Opera’s First Black Prima Ballerina (1951), they are pleased to announce their option of her biography, “Night’s Dancer” by Yael Tamar Lewin, published by Wesleyan University Press, adding layers of depth about the life of this extraordinary and elusive woman, who became a unique concert dance soloist as well as a black trailblazer in the white world of classical ballet. Just as Jackie Robinson broke the color barriers of baseball, Janet Collins broke the toughest barrier in the all-white world of classical ballet. Janet Collins, America’s First Black Prima Ballerina, was a complex artist who challenged the status quo while confronting…

Gerald Vizenor at Birchbark Books!

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Gerald Vizenor has been welcomed by Birchbark Books for a reading from his new book Treaty Shirts: October 2034—A Familiar Treatise on the White Earth Nation. The reading will be held at the Bockley Gallery (near Birchbark Books in Minneapolis) on Tuesday, August 9th at 7pm. Birchbark Books is owned and operated by New York Times bestselling and National Book Award winning author, Louise Erdrich (Ojibwe). As a store that prides itself in their belief in “the power of good writing, the beauty of handmade art, [and] the strength of Native culture,” they are the perfect partner to Vizenor’s Treaty Shirts. In this masterful, candid, surreal, and satirical allegory set in an imagined future, seven natives are exiled from federal sectors that have replaced the federal reservation system.…

Remembering Jelle Zeilinga de Boer

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It is my sad task to inform you that Jelle Zeilinga de Boer, Wesleyan University Press author and Harold T. Stearns Professor of Earth Science, emeritus, passed away last Saturday, a month before his 82nd birthday. Jelle received his BS and PhD from the University of Utrecht before coming to Wesleyan as a postdoctoral fellow in 1963. During his early years at Wesleyan he worked closely with Geology Professor Jim Balsley in the field of paleomagnetism. In 1977 Jelle was named the George I. Seney Professor of Geology and in 1984 he was named the Harold T. Stearns Professor of Earth Sciences. In the 1970s Jelle worked as a joint professor at the University of Rhode Island at the Marine Sciences Institute where he was…

Announcing My Music, My War from Lisa Gilman

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The Listening Habits of U.S. Troops in Iraq and Afghanistan A study of music in the everyday lives of U.S. troops and combat veterans. “A gifted interviewer, Lisa Gilman goes beyond stereotypes of the wounded American soldier by painting a complex and nuanced emotional portrait of contemporary soldiers’ lives, ones which the media rarely allow us to see and hear.” —Jonathan Ritter, coeditor of Music in the Post-9/11 World A study of music in the everyday lives of U.S. troops and combat veterans. During the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, technological developments in music listening enabled troops to carry vast amounts of music with them, and allowed them to easily acquire new music. Digital music files allow for easy sharing, with fellow troops as well…

“Hamilton” History Lessons & The Federalist Papers

The Federalist Papers, edited by Jacob E. Cooke

The Hamilton buzz won’t be ending anytime soon. Lin Manuel Miranda, a Wesleyan alum, has created a hit that will irrefutably change the stage and much beyond. With tickets basically impossible to lay your hands on to this phenomenal rejuvenation to both America’s early history and Broadway’s musical scene, it’s no surprise you can’t go a week without Hamilton coming up. This Broadway musical isn’t just helping American musical practice evolve, either—the show’s ubiquitous presence in American pop culture has teachers across the nation incorporating the score into their history lessons. This contemporary, youthful take on our “founding fathers’ is helping to  revitalize interest in America’s early history. Twenty-thousand New York City 11th graders will be able to go further than just incorporating the soundtrack, though: The Rockefeller Foundation and the…

ReaderCon-27 is on!

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ReaderCon-27 is upon us! This year’s conference is housed in a new location, the Quincy Marriott, Quincy, Massachusetts. Guests of honor are Catherynne M. Valente & Tim Powers; the memorial guest of honor is Diana Wynne Jones. Be sure to visit our table in the book room. Marketing Manager Jackie Wilson will be on hand, with our new books and favorite backlist titles. On Saturday, be sure to swing by to say hello to Chip Delany and Jim Morrow—who will be hanging out intermittently throughout the day. Author Events Samuel R. Delany Reading Friday Night, time TBA James Morrow Saturday, 10:00 AM, Reading Saturday, 11:00 AM, Kaffeeklatsch, with Jacob Weisman Saturday, 12:00 PM, Autographs, with Rick Wilber Saturday, 2:00 PM, “David Hartwell Memorial Panel,” with Robert…

László Moholy-Nagy Retrospective at the Guggenheim Museum

The Theatre of Bauhaus, Gropius

“You would hardly know, from this show, that Moholy-Nagy shared an era with Picasso and Matisse. Perhaps chalk it up to the First World War and the Russian Revolution and a fissure in Western culture between art that maintained conventional mediums and art that subsumed them in a romance with social change and new techniques. The former held firm in France; the latter flourished in Germany. Americans could thrill to both at once, as interchangeable symbols of the ‘modern.’ It was in America, while he was dying, that Moholy-Nagy seemed to realize and begin to remedy the imbalance, exposing the heart that had always pulsed within the technocratic genius. To be a student of his then must have been heaven,” writes The New Yorker’s art critic Peter…

Ted Greenwald, 1942–2016

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It is with sadness that we announce the passing of New York City poet Ted Greenwald (December 19, 1942–June 17, 2016). Ted Greenwald’s poems sing the commons and dance with a homely grace American poetry has rarely seen. WHIFF An evening Spent talking Spent thinking About what my life would be If I’d stayed With a particular girl or woman I went with What would be If I’d’ve been accepted to and gone Where I applied To a different school Than the one I did Where I’d learned Different social graces Then the ones I have Where some of the material Values of the American dream Had rubbed off Enough to make me Live it out In the good-works sense If I’d settled down And settled…